Bath

Body Washes and soaps

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In this category, we will cover all the necessary products intended to be used for bathing. Whether you have dry or sensitive skin, we have the right answers to your questions concerning the safety of ingredients in your favorite products.

1-  Some Current Main Components Used:

  • Citric Acid: used to preserve cosmetics and adjust the acid-base balance
  • Sodium Chloride: It is an inorganic compound that is largely used in personal care products as well as cosmetics. it has a pale yellow to white color and is usually used in water solution.
  • Glycerin: Also known as glycerol, glycerin is a sugar alcohol that can be easily obtained from natural sources. It plays the role of a humectant: meaning it retains moisture in the upper layer of the skin and prevents premature moist from cosmetics. Glycerin has great moisturizing properties as well as it contains cleansing agents. It can be found in personal care products such as soaps, toothpastes, and hair conditioners. 
  • Fragrance: Fragrance ingredients in cosmetics must meet the same requirements for safety as other cosmetic ingredients: they must be safe for consumers when they are used according to labeled directions. Some components of fragrance formulas may have a potential to cause allergic skin reactions or sensitivities for some people. 
  • Stearic Acid:  It is a saturated fatty acid containing an 18- carbon chain. It is listed in the PETA’s caring consumer guide as a substance of animal origin. Stearic acid has opacifying agents, cleansing agents and emulsifying agents. It can be found in cosmetic creams, pastes, and soaps.
  • Lauric Acid: It is one of the several fatty acids that can also be found in coconut oil and is widely used in different types of hygiene products and cosmetics. It is used for its cleansing agents and skin soothing properties.
  • Artificial colors: Synthetic colors are derived from coal tar. Only seven colors remain on the FDA’s approved list; all others have been banned. Yellow #5 is under review due to links to hyperactivity, anxiety, migraines and cancer. If your product contains these, avoid using them.
  • Propylene Glycol: Dipropylene glycol is a clear and colorless liquid derived from alcohol.  It is most often used as a solvent and viscosity decreasing agent in cosmetics and personal care products such as fragrances, shaving, personal cleanliness products, and eye and facial makeup. 
  • Cocamidopropyl Betaine: This ingredient is a very mild and versatile one. Cocamidopropyl Betaine and other related betaines basically act as a detergent and are found in bath products and skin cleansing products. They are surfactants that help cleansing dirt and oils by mixing water with oil and rinse them away.
  • Polysorbate 20: This alongside other polysorbate ingredients are a series of general purpose hydrophilic, nonionic surfactants. These ingredients are usually included in products like skin fresheners, skin cleansers and fragrance powders. The components of this ingredient help other ingredients dissolve in solvents in which they would not normally dissolve and form emulsions. 
  • Dipropylene Glycol: Dipropylene glycol is a clear and colorless liquid derived from alcohol.  It is most often used as a solvent and viscosity decreasing agent in cosmetics and personal care products such as fragrances, shaving, personal cleanliness products, and eye and facial makeup. 
  • Cocamide DEA: This ingredient is used as a foaming agent and is a chemically modified form of coconut oil. it is a thick, white, and waxy substance. Cocamide DEA, Lauramide DEA, and other ingredients increase the capacity of foam and thickens the water portion in cosmetics.

2- Some Current  Hazardous Components to Avoid:

  • Sodium Chloride: It is an inorganic compound that is largely used in personal care products as well as cosmetics. it has a pale yellow to white color and is usually used in water solution. Sodium chloride is considered a hazardous component because it was cited by DOT and EPA. This chemical can cause nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. It can also burn the skin or eyes if put in contact directly without the use of water.
  • Parabens: Parabens are a group of preservative ingredients that are commonly used in many products of our daily lives. They are used in cosmetics, personal care products, food products and even pharmaceuticals. They prevent the spoilage of the materials they are added to as they prevent the growth of fungi and bacteria. The parabens were proven to penetrate the body through the skin and remain within the tissue which disrupts the hormones’ functions.
  • Artificial colors: Synthetic colors are derived from coal tar. Only seven colors remain on the FDA’s approved list; all others have been banned. Yellow #5 is under review due to links to hyperactivity, anxiety, migraines and cancer. If your product contains these, avoid using them.
  • Phthalates: Also known as phthalate esters, are a family of chemical compounds. Those chemicals are used because of their durability and strong performance. They are the most used plasticizers in the world, which means producing or enhancing plasticity and flexibility to the substance they are added to. They are divided into two types: high and low and are used differently depending on their molecular weight. Phthalates are bound into the materials in which they are in and they do not easily migrate out of it or evaporate.
  • Sodium Laureth Sulfate: Those ingredients are used primarily in cleansing products. It helps to clean the skin and hair by helping water to mix with oil and dirt so that they can be rinsed away added to  emulsifying properties. In 2010, the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel evaluated the scientific data for these ingredients and the closely related sodium laureth sulfate and ammonium laureth sulfate and concluded that all of these ingredients were safe for use in cosmetics and personal care products in the present practices of use and concentration, when formulated to be non-irritating.
  • Fragrance: Fragrance ingredients in cosmetics must meet the same requirements for safety as other cosmetic ingredients: they must be safe for consumers when they are used according to labeled directions. Some components of fragrance formulas may have a potential to cause allergic skin reactions or sensitivities for some people.
  • Toluene: Also known as methylbenzene is an aromatic hydrocarbon. It occurs naturally in crude oil and tolu tree and has a distinctive sweet smell. It is widely used in nail polish removers due to its ability to dissolve some substances such as plasticizers and resins. This chemical can irritate the skin, eyes as well as the respiratory tract. When inhaled, this ingredient can also cause systemic toxicity.
  • Triclosan: It is an aromatic ether that has antibacterial and antifungal agents. This chemical is lipophilic, which means that it has the ability to accumulate in fatty acids. It was proven that triclosan can disrupt endocrine as well as affect the function of thyroid. This ingredient is restricted in cosmetics in many countries already such as Canada and Japan.

3- Natural Alternatives:

  •  Baking Soda: An efficient substitute of body wash is baking soda. Also known as sodium bicarbonate, this product can result in a great alternative when mixed with water until dissolved. You can add to it coconut oil as well as peppermint or lavender essential oils which will help lift your mood.
  • African Black Soap: Originating from Africa as its name states, this soap is slowly rising to fame even though it was used for ages before. It is 100% natural and is totally safe to use as an alternative to all the chemicals found in bath washes and soaps. Some of its ingredients are cocoa pod ash, cocoa leaves and shea butter. 
  • Mashed Fruits: This might sound very weird to you, but yes, mashed fruits are indeed an effective substitute for sold body washes. Fruits are not only good for your body by eating, some of them are extra rich in alpha hydroxy acids (AHA’s) such as strawberries, oranges and blueberries. the AHA’s dissolve dead cells that are found on the surface of the skin which leaves you with a soft and smooth skin after your shower. 
  • Natural Handmade Soaps: It is not an easy task to drop soap for good. If you are not ready yet to completely abandon the use of commercial soaps and body washes, you can start by making your own homemade soap. Shea butter, coconut oil, lavender or olive oil are usually a great base for a homemade natural soap. 

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